Worrying figures show reluctance to get an eye exam - Cameron Optometry | Cameron Optometry
Worrying figures show reluctance to get an eye exam

Worrying figures show reluctance to get an eye exam

Posted on 18th August 2014

Spectrum Thea produced an interesting piece of research which showed two thirds of optometrists have seen an increase in the number of younger patients presenting with eye problems. It points to the increased use of PCs and deteriorating health of a generation as possible factors. This is certainly something that we as an industry need to try to tackle, however the part of the research I found most worrying, was the fact that still one in ten would only have an eye exam if they were experiencing problems.

Cameron Optometry has a strong focus on expertise and the use of the most advanced technology. This isn’t because we like to show off with the latest piece of kit. It is because our technology allows us to pick up issues in the very early stages. At the point when we can hopefully do something about it, either with treatment to eradicate the issue or by devising a programme of treatment to ensure the progression of the condition is slowed. If we only see people when they identify issues themselves then it could well be too late to halt the condition’s progression.

Eye exams must be seen as part of maintaining general health and as such we must ensure people have their eyes examined at least every two years, more frequently if they have any vision issues.

I was also concerned to read that still two thirds of Brits would go to a doctor with an eye infection with only a fifth opting to visit their optometrist. Yet, it is an optometrist who will have the correct equipment to undertake a thorough eye examination required and a prescribing optometrist will also be able to give you an NHS prescription if required, same as a GP.

Another worrying figure was a massive 90% of optometrists surveyed felt that they don’t think people take their eye health seriously or look after their eyes as much as they should. In addition, less than half of patients say they would get checked out if they had blurred vision after spending time in front of a screen and a third wouldn’t visit an optometrist even if they were unable to read small print. Worryingly for road users only 55% of those surveyed would visit an optometrist if they struggled to read road signs.

Clearly as an industry we still have a battle on our hands when it comes to communicating the importance of looking after ones eyes. I would say that Cameron Optometry patients are generally better ‘trained’ in the importance of good eye care having had it drummed into them over the years but how many times do I have to say to people, you only get one set of eyes so look after them?


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